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lasting enduring or persisting for a long time. [2 definitions]
Last Judgment in Christianity, the end of the world and the judging of each individual soul by God.
lastly in conclusion; finally.
last name a surname.
last quarter the time of month between the second half-moon and the new moon. [2 definitions]
last rites final ceremonies for a recently dead person. [2 definitions]
last straw the most recent in a series of irritations or disappointments, which causes a loss of endurance, patience, temper, or the like.
Last Supper according to the New Testament, the last meal of Jesus Christ and his disciples on the evening before the Crucifixion; Lord's Supper. [2 definitions]
last word the final sentence or phrase with which one person ends an argument. [3 definitions]
lat. abbreviation of "latitude," the angular distance between the equator and a point north or south on the earth's surface, as measured in degrees.
Latakia a variety of aromatic Turkish smoking tobacco.
latch a fastening or lock, as for a door, with a bar or bolt that falls or slides into a catch, slot, or hole. [2 definitions]
latchkey a key that releases a latch, esp. on an outer door or gate. [2 definitions]
latch onto (informal) to fasten oneself to. [2 definitions]
latchstring a string attached to a latch and passed through a hole in a door, allowing the latch to be opened from the outside.
late happening after the usual or expected time. [7 definitions]
late bloomer one who achieves maturity, proficiency, or the like at a more advanced age than is considered normal or usual.
latecomer one who arrives late.
lateen of or designating a triangular sail that is hung on a long, sloping yard, which is in turn attached at an angle to a short mast. [2 definitions]
Late Greek the Greek language between the third and sixth centuries, esp. in patristic literature.
Late Latin the Latin language between the third and sixth centuries, esp. in patristic literature.