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dosage the administration or taking of doses, esp. of medicine. [2 definitions]
do's and don'ts actions or customs, collectively correct or appropriate and wrong or inappropriate, respectively.
dose a specified amount, esp. of medicine, administered or prescribed to be taken at one time or at certain intervals. [6 definitions]
do-si-do a movement in square dancing in which two dancers approach each other, pass around each other back to back, and return to their original positions. [4 definitions]
dosimeter a portable instrument that measures amounts of radiation, such as gamma rays or x-rays, to which a person has been exposed.
dossier a set of papers or documents that provide detailed information on a particular person or subject.
dot a little mark or spot; speck. [9 definitions]
dotage weakness of mind or foolishness, esp. when accompanying old age; senility. [2 definitions]
dotard one who has become feeble-minded, esp. in old age.
dote to have or exhibit excessive fondness or affection, esp. for a person (usu. fol. by on or upon). [2 definitions]
do the honors to function as a host; serve.
do the laundry to wash your clothes or other things that are dirty.
do the trick to accomplish a result that one wants.
doting extremely or excessively affectionate. [2 definitions]
dot matrix a system of forming characters and graphics, as on computer screens or printers, by patterns of closely spaced dots.
dotted swiss a crisp cotton fabric with woven or embroidered dots, used for blouses and curtains.
dotterel any of several plovers, esp. one of Europe and Asia.
dottle the residue of partially burnt tobacco or ash left in a pipe bowl after smoking.
dotty1 (informal) eccentric, weak-minded, or a little crazy; daft. [4 definitions]
dotty2 having dots on the surface; dotted.
Douay Bible an English translation of the Bible, based on the Vulgate and completed in 1610, that was the officially approved text of the Roman Catholic Church.