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quitclaim the transfer of one's interest, right, or title, as to a piece of property, without a guarantee that the title is good or that there are no debts attached to the property. [2 definitions]
quite to the greatest extent; completely; entirely. [3 definitions]
quite a few a rather large number of people or things.
Quito the capital of Ecuador.
quitrent rent paid by a feudal freeholder in the place of services otherwise required.
quits having no grounds for hostility, dissatisfaction, or a further claim, as the result of a repayment or equitable settlement.
quittance a freeing from something owed, such as a duty, debt, or punishment. [3 definitions]
quitter someone who habitually gives up or admits defeat, esp. when faced by difficulties or danger.
quiver1 to shake or tremble slightly. [2 definitions]
quiver2 a case designed to hold and transport arrows, often strapped to the back or waist. [2 definitions]
qui vive (French) who goes there?
quixotic absurdly and impractically gallant or idealistic.
quiz to question so as to test students' learning, esp. informally and without prior notification. [4 definitions]
quiz program a radio or television program in which people compete for prizes by answering questions; quiz show.
quizzical expressing doubt, confusion, or questioning; puzzled. [3 definitions]
quodlibet a formal debate or argument, as on a theological or philosophical problem. [2 definitions]
quoin a corner of an outside wall. [4 definitions]
quoit (pl., used with a sing. verb) a game in which players try to toss metal or rope rings over or near a distant short metal stake. [2 definitions]
quondam having been in the past; former.
Quonset hut trademark for a prebuilt shelter of corrugated metal, having the shape of a halved cylinder standing on its flat side, sometimes used for storage.
quorum the number of members that an organization's rules require to attend a meeting in order for voting or other business to take place.