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benevolent

be·nev·o·lent

benevolent

 
pronunciation:
b ne v lnt
features:
Word Parts
part of speech: adjective
definition 1: desiring to do good for others; generous.
Thanks to many benevolent people, our fund-raiser has been a success.
synonyms:
altruistic, bounteous, considerate, generous
antonyms:
diabolical, evil, malevolent, malign, mean, tightfisted, unkind
similar words:
big, bighearted, charitable, good, good-hearted, humanitarian, kind, magnanimous, munificent, philanthropic, thoughtful, unselfish
definition 2: intended to benefit others rather than to make a profit; altruistic.
Several benevolent organizations are working in the area to help the needy.The couple's donation of funds for the public swimming pool was a benevolent act.
synonyms:
charitable, eleemosynary, nonprofit
similar words:
altruistic, generous, good, humanitarian, philanthropic
definition 3: marked by good will; kindly.
My grandfather was a benevolent old man, and we loved being in his company.
synonyms:
beneficent, benign, friendly, good, kind, kindly
antonyms:
baleful, malevolent, malicious, malignant, spiteful, unkind, venomous, vicious
similar words:
benignant, bighearted, charitable, considerate, generous, gentle, good-hearted, propitious, warm-hearted
derivation: benevolently (adv.)
Word Parts
The word benevolent contains the following parts:
ben, bene, bon Latin root that means good, well
synonyms:
eu
antonyms:
mal, male
 
vol Latin root that means wish, intention, will
-ant, -ent Latin adjective- and noun-forming suffix that means In nouns: one who or that which does the action denoted by the base verb.
Show wordsHide wordsMore about this word part:
The suffix -ant , -ent forms adjectives and, to a much lesser extent, nouns from Latin verb stems such as fid in confident and stud in student . This suffix is the equivalent in Latin of the "-ing" inflection in English. Many adjectives ending in -ant , -ent have a corresponding noun ending in -ance, -ence, -ancy, -ency.