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adequate

ad·e·quate

adequate

 
 
pronunciation:
ae d kwiht
features:
Word Parts
part of speech: adjective
definition 1: good enough or well enough suited for the situation or need; satisfactory.
Make sure the children have adequate clothing for the winter weather.
 
synonyms:
satisfactory
antonyms:
deficient, improper, inadequate, unsuitable, wanting
similar words:
acceptable, all right, allowable, ample, appropriate, comfortable, commensurate, competent, decent, enough, fitting, marginal, proportionate, respectable, sufficient, suitable
definition 2: just barely good enough.
As a teacher, he was adequate, but nowhere near excellent.
synonyms:
all right, fair, marginal, passable, so-so
antonyms:
deficient, inadequate, unsatisfactory
similar words:
acceptable, average, competent, indifferent, mediocre, middling
definition 3: sufficient in quantity; enough.
The army had adequate supplies for the campaign.The new instructors don't have adequate experience.
synonyms:
enough, sufficient
antonyms:
deficient, inadequate, insufficient
derivation: adequately (adv.)
Word Parts
The word adequate contains the following parts:
ad- Latin prefix that means to, toward
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Originally a Latin preposition and prefix, ad- occurs in English in Latin loanwords. It has multiple forms, as the final 'd' sound in ad- assimilates to the initial sound of the base to which it is attached. See its assimilated forms: ac-, af-, ag-1, al-, an-, ap-, ar-, as-, and at-.
-ate1 Latin verb-forming suffix that means to make, cause, do
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The suffix -ate primarily forms transitive verbs from Latin bases. Many -ate verbs were loanwords from Latin. Verbs ending in -ate combine with the suffix -ion to form nouns ending in -ation. These verbs also have corresponding agent nouns ending in -ator (navigator, dictator, elevator).