Children's, Intermediate and Advanced Online English Dictionary & Thesaurus

Comprehensive
Dictionary Suite
Help
Help
Help
 
   
Display options
Show syllables
Show Lookup History
Double-Click Lookup
  Show Spanish support
  Show Word Combinations
 
Pronunciation
Wordsmyth
  Phonics
  IPA
 
Entry formats
Standard
  Classic
 
Lookup History
comic

com·ic

comic

 
 
pronunciation:
ka mihk
parts of speech:
adjective, noun
features:
Word Explorer, Word Parts
part of speech: adjective
definition 1: of, relating to, or characterized by comedy; comical or comedic.
I enjoy his comic novels and find his more serious works a bit pretentious.Her new play is a comic masterpiece.He is an actor more famous for his comic roles than his dramatic roles.
antonyms:
dramatic, serious, tragic
similar words:
comical
definition 2: participating in or producing comedy.
She has become one of the nation's best comic writers.Known only as a comic actor, he had hopes of someday changing his image.
definition 3: causing amusement; comical.
It was a comic predicament when our dog dashed down the steps and bounded onto the school bus.
antonyms:
lachrymose, serious
definition 4: pertaining to a series of cartoons, or to a book, magazine, or newspaper section devoted to such series.
I always read the comic strips in the Sunday paper.Our favorite comic books were the adventure ones.
 
part of speech: noun
definition 1: a comedian, esp. a professional entertainer specializing in comedy.
We have some great comics performing here for you tonight.
similar words:
comedian
definition 2: (pl.) one or more series of cartoons, or a book, magazine, or newspaper section devoted to such series.
He never reads the articles in the newspaper; he just likes the comics.
Word Explorer
See
  literature
Word Parts
The word comic contains the following part:
-ic Latin and Greek adjective-forming suffix that means like, pertaining to
Show wordsHide wordsMore about this word part:
The suffix -ic attaches to roots and words of Greek or Latin origin to form adjectives. A few words ending in -ic (magic , critic , music ) were adjectives that became nouns in Greek before they entered English, also as nouns.