Monthly Archives: April 2013

Apr
26
2013

Meet your free Wordsmyth Dictionary Widget

The Wordsmyth Blog now comes accessorized with the nifty Wordsmyth Dictionary Widget. The Dictionary Widget is also available free from our website (here). Because it needs to be experienced to be fully appreciated, we’ve made it easy for you to try it here on our blog pages.

Try it here, now

1. Look in the upper right corner of this page. You’ll see the widget with a search box.

2. Double-click on any word on this page–a word in this or the following sentence, for example: Don’t clutter my etagere with your gimcracks!

3. You’ll see the word you clicked on appear in the widget search box, and, lo and behold, a concise entry for the word will appear in the widget. The concise entry includes pronunciation, audio pronunciation, part of speech, definitions, examples, and even images. To view the complete entry (with synonyms, antonyms, and derived words), click on the ‘See full entry’ link.

4. Don’t like the widget in the upper right corner? You can drag it to any spot in the window and it will stay there unless you move it. You can also shrink or expand the widget window, or close it, by clicking on the icons in the upper right corner of the widget. If you close the widget, it will remain closed until you double-click on a word. The diagonal arrow is another way to go to the full dictionary entry.

Look up any word on any webpage

If you would like to be able to look up any word on any web page in the same way, visit our widget page at the Comprehensive Dictionary or the Word Explorer Dictionary for Children. All you have to do to install it is drag the link for the Wordsmyth Floater or Wordsmyth Pop-up Widget to your browser toolbar. (For more information, see our FAQ.)

Let us know what you (or your students) think!

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Apr
26
2013

apply

Posted in Academic Vocabulary of the Day by admin2

pronunciation:    ə plaI
part of speech:    transitive verb

definition 1:         to make use of or put to use.
example:               I had to apply every bit of my knowledge of computers to solve the problem.

definition 2:        to put into effect or action.
example:               If you apply the principles that I describe in my book, your business is sure to be successful.
example:               You can’t really play the game without applying the rules. 
(more…)

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Apr
25
2013

research

Posted in Academic Vocabulary of the Day by admin2

 rih suhrch  [or]  ri suhrch

 noun
definition 1:  systematic investigation and study to obtain and analyze information, as about a theory, event, intellectual discipline, or the like.
example:  The institute is conducting research on the benefits of sleep.
example:  More research needs to be carried out before a cure can be found for this disease.
example:  I had to do some research in the library for my history paper. (more…)

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Apr
25
2013

calque

Posted in Word of the Day by admin

kaelk

noun

definition: a word adopted into one language from another through the translation of each root or morpheme of the foreign word.
example: In English, the word “masterpiece” is a calque of the Dutch word “meesterstuk.” In French, the word “gratte-ciel” is a calque based on the translation of the words “scrape” and “sky” in the English compound word “skyscraper.” (more…)

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Apr
24
2013

report

Posted in Academic Vocabulary of the Day by admin2

rih port

noun

definition:  a statement or account of something, usually detailed.
example:  I did a good deal of research on the subject and then wrote up my report.
example:  The report on India included some interesting statistics.
example:  Did you hear the news report last night?
(more…)

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