Children's, Intermediate and Advanced Online English Dictionary & Thesaurus

Monthly Archives: March 2014

Mar
27
2014

flagrant

Posted in Word of the Day by admin

fleI grənt

adjective

1. exceptionally and openly bad or offensive; disgraceful; scandalous.
example: The government was condemned for its flagrant violation of international law and human rights.



Mar
26
2014

radical

Posted in Academic Vocabulary of the Day by admin2

rae dih k@l

adjective
definition 1:  of or relating to roots, origins, or fundamental characteristics; basic.
example:  There are radical differences between these two systems of government.

definition 2:  extreme or complete, as a particular action or behavior.
example:  The parents’ divorce brought about a radical change in the lives of the children.
example: His ideas were considered radical, and few people took him seriously.

definition 3:  advocating drastic changes in laws, government, or society.
example:  The government tried to suppress all radical groups.
example:  Some professors were fired because of their radical political activities.
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Mar
25
2014

scathe

Posted in Word of the Day by admin

skeIth

transitive verb

1. to injure with criticism.
example: He had heard of the sardonic, the cruel humour with which the writer scathed his contemporaries.

2. to injure or damage by, or as if by, fire.
example: But when the flames vanished, Jason still stood there, barely singed or scathed.



Mar
25
2014

merely

Posted in Academic Vocabulary of the Day by admin2

mir li

adverb
definition:  only; simply; nothing more than.
example:  He’s merely a child, and he won’t understand these adult matters.
example:  I merely wanted your opinion; I’m not asking for your advice.
example:  The student’s knowledge of Blake’s poetry was merely superficial.

See full entry



Mar
24
2014

scintilla

Posted in Word of the Day by admin

sihn tI
noun
a tiny amount; trace.
example: There was not a scintilla of truth in the rumor.

Note: “Scintilla” is usually used in negative constructions, as in “not a scintilla of…,” and frequently to convey a complete lack of truth, evidence, or proof.
“Scintilla” is a Latin word meaning “spark, particle of fire, atom.”  The English verb “scintillate” retains the fiery element and can mean “to give off sparks” (literally) or “to sparkle intellectually.” 548225_3d_spichka_iskryi_ogon_1920x1200_(www.GdeFon.ru)