Children's, Intermediate and Advanced Online English Dictionary & Thesaurus

  • Word of the Day
    carouse

    k@ raUz

    intransitive verb
    to revel in a boisterous and drunken manner.
    They’d been carousing in the bar and were now staggering home, still singing and shouting.

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  • Vocabulary of the Day
    notify

    no tih faI

    transitive verb
    to give notice to; tell or inform, esp. formally.
    The contest judges notified the winners by mail.
    Who should we notify in case of an emergency?
    The landlord notified the tenants that the water would be shut off in the morning.

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Aug
13
2013

incursion

in·cur·sion

ihn kuhr zhən

noun

1. a raid or sudden invasion.
example: Our troops led an incursion on the small village.

2. an encroachment or inroad.
example: She resented this incursion on her privacy.

Word in the news:

From the Times of India:

August 8, 2013
TOKYO: Japan protested to China on Thursday over the presence of Chinese coast guard vessels in waters near disputed islands in the East China Sea, in what Tokyo says was China’s longest incursion into the area so far.

From Fortune Magazine:

August 12, 2013
There are other ways to access fetal DNA of course — Amniocentesis for instance, or the more accurate chorionic villus sampling (or CVS) test — but these require a physical incursion into the neighborhood of the fetus itself (usually via a long needle or tube) which ups the risk of miscarriage and pregnancy-complicating infections.

From Australian Mining:

August 12, 2013
Opposition to the mines has concentrated on the potential impacts of new mines on the endangered devils. These include habitat destruction, roadkill and the risk that an expanded road network will facilitate the incursion of [Tasmanian] devils carrying the facial tumour disease.

Etymology

The word “incursion” comes form the Latin verb incurrere, meaning “to run into or at.” Currere means to run, and the root “cur” appears in many English words, including “current,” “cursive,” “occur,” and (after passing through French) “courier.”