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best-ball of or designating a system of scoring in golf competition in which, on each hole, the lower score of either partner is recorded as the score for that team.
best-case scenario the best possible way that things could proceed from a particular point on.
bestial like a beast, esp. in brutality or order of intelligence.
bestiality beastlike or brutish conduct or character. [2 definitions]
bestialize to turn (a human being) into a beast; bring out the beastly qualities in.
bestiary a medieval collection of descriptions of or fables about real or mythical animals, in which each animal's nature is used to draw a moral point.
bestir to stir or rouse (usu. oneself) to action.
best-known most well-known.
best man the bridegroom's principal attendant at a wedding.
bestow to give, as a gift or award (usu. fol. by "on" or "upon"). [2 definitions]
bestrew to scatter over or cover; strew. [2 definitions]
bestride to be astride of; straddle. [3 definitions]
bestseller a book or other product that outsells most others of its kind during a specified period.
bet to agree to give up (usu. money) to another person if one's prediction of some future result does not occur. [7 definitions]
beta the name of the second letter of the Greek alphabet.
beta blocker any of a class of drugs that inhibit the absorption of adrenalin and the activity of the autonomic nervous system, and are used to control the heartbeat and relieve angina and hypertension.
beta-carotene a molecule of the carotene family that has a red-orange color and is abundant in plants.
betake to take (usu. oneself) somewhere.
beta particle a high-speed positron or electron ejected from a nucleus in radioactive decay or fission.
beta ray a stream of beta particles, esp. those with a negative charge.
betatron in physics, an electron accelerator in which the speed of the electrons is increased to high energies, from a few million to a few hundred million electron volts, by the action of a rapidly changing magnetic field.